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[2007/10/09]
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Mr. Lim Teik How, 2nd Year doctor course student
Department of Medical Biophysics and Radiation Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University



To be a physician well versed in both the clinical and research aspects of medicine.

Malaysia’s multicultural demographic is a combination of Malays (60% of the population), Chinese (30%), Indians and other races. Mr Lim’s father, the son of an immigrant from the mainland of China, is a practicing physician who graduated from Trinity College, Ireland. Being the only physician in a relatively large family (Mr. Lim’s father has nine other siblings), this inspired Mr. Lim to pursue a career in medicine from an early age. Continuing the trend set by his older brother, Mr. Lim’s younger brother also decided upon medicine, and is presently enrolled in Adelaide University, School of Medicine in Australia.

As part of his academic career, Mr Lim studied at the International Medical University in Malaysia for two and a half years before completing his education at the University of Calgary, Faculty of Medicine, Canada. Upon graduation he was awarded the degree of MD (Doctor of Medicine). Both faculties of medicine at the University of Calgary as well as Kyushu University have shared an active student exchange program beginning in November 2001. Since then, each year during the summer several five year students from Kyushu University have attended short courses at their partner medical school.

Following his graduation, and while working in the International Medical University in Malaysia, Mr. Lim became interested in the field of research and decided to pursue his interest in the land of the rising sun. In light of the agreement that existed between the two aforementioned universities, information to assist in this endeavor became readily available, and Mr. Lim successfully applied for the Japanese Government (Monbukagakusho : MEXT) Scholarship.

Arriving in Japan in October of 2005, Mr. Lim was enrolled in a six month Japanese Language course at Kyushu University, as part of the university’s introductory program for international students. His research training officially began on April 2006, under the tutelage of Professor Teruhisa Tsuzuki. The research theme surrounds the suppression of carcinogenesis as a result of damaged DNA. Damage to the genetic material of the human body can easily set into motion the process of cancer, yet at the same time this potential for carcinogenesis is suppressed by defense mechanisms inherent to each cell. It is this innate ability to defend itself that Mr. Lim’s research is focused upon.

With his eyes set towards returning home in the future, where he hopes to practice clinical medicine as well as carry out research at the same time, Mr. Lim is learning as much as he can, often putting in 12 hour days. In times of leisure he finds joy in drawing, and has become an avid fan of sumo since arriving in Japan, having attended the actual tournament twice already. The point of interest for him, he says, is “the elaborate rituals that precede the actual match, which itself often lasts for less than ten seconds.”

To be a physician well versed in both the clinical and research aspects of medicine.

Malaysia’s multicultural demographic is a combination of Malays (60% of the population), Chinese (30%), Indians and other races. Mr Lim’s father, the son of an immigrant from the mainland of China, is a practicing physician who graduated from Trinity College, Ireland. Being the only physician in a relatively large family (Mr. Lim’s father has nine other siblings), this inspired Mr. Lim to pursue a career in medicine from an early age. Continuing the trend set by his older brother, Mr. Lim’s younger brother also decided upon medicine, and is presently enrolled in Adelaide University, School of Medicine in Australia.

As part of his academic career, Mr Lim studied at the International Medical University in Malaysia for two and a half years before completing his education at the University of Calgary, Faculty of Medicine, Canada. Upon graduation he was awarded the degree of MD (Doctor of Medicine). Both faculties of medicine at the University of Calgary as well as Kyushu University have shared an active student exchange program beginning in November 2001. Since then, each year during the summer several five year students from Kyushu University have attended short courses at their partner medical school.

Following his graduation, and while working in the International Medical University in Malaysia, Mr. Lim became interested in the field of research and decided to pursue his interest in the land of the rising sun. In light of the agreement that existed between the two aforementioned universities, information to assist in this endeavor became readily available, and Mr. Lim successfully applied for the Japanese Government (Monbukagakusho : MEXT) Scholarship.

Arriving in Japan in October of 2005, Mr. Lim was enrolled in a six month Japanese Language course at Kyushu University, as part of the university’s introductory program for international students. His research training officially began on April 2006, under the tutelage of Professor Teruhisa Tsuzuki. The research theme surrounds the suppression of carcinogenesis as a result of damaged DNA. Damage to the genetic material of the human body can easily set into motion the process of cancer, yet at the same time this potential for carcinogenesis is suppressed by defense mechanisms inherent to each cell. It is this innate ability to defend itself that Mr. Lim’s research is focused upon.

With his eyes set towards returning home in the future, where he hopes to practice clinical medicine as well as carry out research at the same time, Mr. Lim is learning as much as he can, often putting in 12 hour days. In times of leisure he finds joy in drawing, and has become an avid fan of sumo since arriving in Japan, having attended the actual tournament twice already. The point of interest for him, he says, is “the elaborate rituals that precede the actual match, which itself often lasts for less than ten seconds.”

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